How to make a vision board that works!

 In Feng Shui Workshops

There are many ways to make a vision board. You can tag and curate photos from Pinterest and create one on their app. There are software programs now that will help you create one on any of your devices. I’ve seen examples of people who have created multi-media vision boards with photos and video and scrolling text that they can pull up and play whenever. There is a way out there for you to create a vision board in any medium and form you like!

The key is to find one that will work for you. And, by “work for you” I mean it helps you to successfully manifest your visions!

The key that has worked for me, and my clients, over the past four years is using feng shui principles to organize their vision boards.

As a feng shui practitioner, I use the principles and practices of this ancient Chinese design and placement philosophy and program – the Bagua, the 5 Elements, and yin/yang balance — to help my clients reach their goals by arranging their environments to support them. I use those same principles and practices to help my vision board workshop attendees arrange their vision boards to help them manifest their dreams.

We start our organization with the Bagua, which identifies areas of our lives and locates them in space. The Bagua areas for each of us are:

  • the journey (can be a career, life’s work or current activity)
  • self-knowledge and learning
  • health and family connections
  • wealth and prosperity
  • fame and reputation
  • love and marriage
  • creativity and children
  • connecting with others (helpful people) and travel

And they are organized in space like this:

A graphic of the 8 feng shui bagua areas with symbolic images representing their meanings, for example, a pair of birds to represent the Love & Marriage area.

Using the feng shui bagua helps to make your vision board work for you.

This organization helps us to place images that represent our life/Bagua areas in the correct placement on the board. This helps us to intentionally honor and balance our dreams and create vision boards that are not just focused on one area of life, like a job or a romance. The board literally shows you that your life is multi-faceted, like the beautiful jewel that it is. And when we balance and harmonize all areas of our lives, we often find that the goals we hope to achieve in one area begin to manifest. This makes sense. If we get too focused on one aspect of life, a job, for instance, doesn’t something often fall through the cracks? When we remember to be ourselves and balance our lives with work, rest and play, usually things work out. Countless books and movies express my point here. (Working Girl is one of my favorites: Shy but brilliant assistant, Tess (played by Melanie Griffith) doesn’t get the big job until she starts being herself, allowing herself to enjoy the process and fall in love with Jack, (Harrison Ford) who’s already fallen in love with her. OK, you get this.

In addition to the organization of the vision board around the Bagua, I also recommend balancing the board with a variety of color, in both light and dark, and different shapes. Some folks love a vision board that has picture overlapping picture (a very yin board) and others like space between their images (a more yang-energetic board.) This is a personal choice. I like a board that is big enough to capture all your dreams – so I recommend a 20” x 30” (at least) vision board on a rigid poster board that you can move around to find just the right place to put it so you’ll engage with it every day. (See an example here.)

The last and arguably most important key for how to make a vision board that works is actually looking at every day, soaking up those selected images that represent your dreams, reveling in them and enjoying your creation. This act alone is important because you are changing the neural pathways in your mind while you’re looking at your board. You are feeding those dreams directly into your brain, whose job is it to figure out how to make them come to life.*

Now that your board is finished, place it in an area where you’ll see it and engage with it every day. I like to stand in front of mine in what author Amy Cuddy (Presence, Bringing Your Boldest Self to Your Biggest Challenges) calls the Power Position, but you may know it from yoga as Star pose: arms raised and reaching up and out, feet apart for support, head held high and straight ahead, focused on your masterpiece. Now that’s engagement with your board!

One of my dreams every year is to share the powerful organizing principles of feng shui and help my workshop attendees to use them to create and complete their vision boards for the year. Come join us to create your vision for 2019.

*For a wonderful explanation about how the brain works to do this read John Assarof and Murray Smith’s excellent book The Answer, Chapter 4, The Universe inside Your Brain. Yep, this is the same John Assarof you may have met when reading The Secret (or watching the film) who tells the story about manifesting his beautiful new home from his vision board.

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A completed vision board with cut out images from magazines, photos, postcards and maps placed on a white poster board organized by the 8 feng shui bagua areas.